Really?

Off-topic general discussion, for everything else.
User avatar
Bama
Bug Hunter
Posts: 4373

Re: Really?

Post by Bama »

Quick question for you essential oils people

Which oil is used for calming down people?

Chloroform?

Is it chloroform?

It is chloroform isn't it?
Gabba Gabba Hey!!!
kentares likes this.
Top
User avatar
Bama
Bug Hunter
Posts: 4373

Re: Really?

Post by Bama »

Why is there a “d” in fridge but not in refrigerator?

One more

The word scent is the “s” or is the “c” silent?
Gabba Gabba Hey!!!
User avatar
Bama
Bug Hunter
Posts: 4373

Re: Really?

Post by Bama »

Easy one .........finish the joke.....



......excuse me but I have a question about the menu please.


I got ..... the men I please is none of your freaking business
Gabba Gabba Hey!!!
Made In Quebec likes this.
Top
User avatar
Bama
Bug Hunter
Posts: 4373

Re: Really?

Post by Bama »

Synonym ........




............. a word you use when you can’t spell the word you wanted to use
Gabba Gabba Hey!!!
User avatar
Made In Quebec
Posts: 763

Re: Really?

Post by Made In Quebec »

Bama wrote: November 25th, 2020, 3:18 pm Synonym ........




............. a word you use when you can’t spell the word you wanted to use
That's hisc.... his... hyst..... funny!
Image
kentares and Bama like this.
Top
User avatar
Bama
Bug Hunter
Posts: 4373

Re: Really?

Post by Bama »

The adjective for metal is metallic but it isn’t for iron.......





















..........which I find ironic
Gabba Gabba Hey!!!
User avatar
Bama
Bug Hunter
Posts: 4373

Re: Really?

Post by Bama »

The ‘Boy asked me why I speak so softly in the house

I told him I was worried that NSA was listening

He laughed

I laughed

My husband laughed



















Alexa laughed
Gabba Gabba Hey!!!
Calvin likes this.
Top
User avatar
Bama
Bug Hunter
Posts: 4373

Re: Really?

Post by Bama »

Seamus the farmer had a nagging wife.

She made his life miserable. The only real peace he got was when he was out in the field ploughing.

One day while in the field, Seamus’s wife brought him his lunch. Then while he quietly ate she berated him with a constant stream of nagging and complaining. Suddenly, Seamus’s old donkey kicked up his back legs, struck her in the head killing her instantly.

At the funeral, the Priest noticed that when the women offered their sympathy, Seamus would nod his head up and down. But when the men came up and spoke quietly to him, he would shake his head from side to side.

After the mourners left, the Priest approached Seamus and asked, “Why did you nod your head up and down to all the women and shook from side to side to all the men?”

Well, Seamus replied, “The women all said how nice she looked, and her dress was so pretty, so I agreed by nodding my head up and down. And all the men asked, “Is that donkey for sale?”
Gabba Gabba Hey!!!
User avatar
Bama
Bug Hunter
Posts: 4373

Re: Really?

Post by Bama »

Irish Wristwatch
Gabba Gabba Hey!!!
User avatar
Bama
Bug Hunter
Posts: 4373

Re: Really?

Post by Bama »

uga.jpg
uga.jpg (25.24 KiB) Viewed 437 times
Gabba Gabba Hey!!!
User avatar
Bama
Bug Hunter
Posts: 4373

Re: Really?

Post by Bama »

Precrastinator:

A person who hurries to get everything done in advance to decrease their mental workload.
Gabba Gabba Hey!!!
User avatar
Bama
Bug Hunter
Posts: 4373

Re: Really?

Post by Bama »

I remember my coach asking me if I would be able to perform under pressure?




I stared my coach in the eyes and said......." I'm not sure but I do know Bohemian Rhapsody "
Gabba Gabba Hey!!!
Calvin likes this.
Top
User avatar
Bama
Bug Hunter
Posts: 4373

Re: Really?

Post by Bama »

Deck of playing cards

52 cards for 52 weeks in the year.
2 colors for day and night
4 suits for the 4 seasons and 13 weeks per season.
Twelve court cards representing the 12 months.

If we add each of the cards (ace + ace + ace + ace + two + two + two + two ... etc) we will get 365.

Jokers are used in leap years.


There is an old song where the deck of cards is used instead of a bible or something like that by T Texas Tyler
Gabba Gabba Hey!!!
User avatar
Calvin
Posts: 4557
Location: UK

Re: Really?

Post by Calvin »

Bama wrote: November 27th, 2020, 2:56 pm Precrastinator:

A person who hurries to get everything done in advance to decrease their mental workload.
procrastinator

pro - as in in favour of

crastinum - latin for tomorrow

;)
User avatar
Calvin
Posts: 4557
Location: UK

Re: Really?

Post by Calvin »

Bama wrote: November 25th, 2020, 4:01 am Why is there a “d” in fridge but not in refrigerator?

One more

The word scent is the “s” or is the “c” silent?
"frigid (adj.)

1620s, "intensely cold," from Latin frigidus "cold, chill, cool," figuratively "indifferent," also "flat, dull, trivial," from stem of frigere "be cold;" related to noun frigus "cold, coldness, frost," from Proto-Italic *srigos-, from PIE root *srig- "cold" (source also of Greek rhigos "cold, frost"). The meaning "wanting in sexual heat" is attested from 1650s, originally of males. Related: Frigidly; frigidness."

doesn't have a d in it either tho :S


Q: Who put the “d” in “fridge”? If it’s short for “refrigerator,” why isn’t it “frig”?

A: Although most dictionaries list “fridge” as the only spelling for this abbreviated version of “refrigerator,” a few do indeed include the “d”-less version “frig” as a variant spelling.

The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language (5th ed.), for example, has only the “fridge” spelling, while Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary (11th ed.) includes “frig” as a variant.

Some American dictionaries describe the “frig” spelling as British, but all the British dictionaries we’ve checked (Macmillan, Collins, Longman, etc.) list only “fridge” for the short form of “refrigerator.”

Interestingly, the earliest written example for the term in the Oxford English Dictionary uses the “frig” spelling (plus an apostrophe). In fact, five of the eight OED examples spell the term without the “d” (some with and some without the apostrophe).

The first “frig” citation in Oxford is from E. F. Spanner’s 1926 novel Broken Trident: “Best part of our stuff here is chilled, and with no ’frig plant working, the mercury will climb like a rocket.”

However, a reader of the blog has informed us of earlier examples of “frig” and the plural “friges” as shortened forms of “refrigerator.”

S. Wilding Cole uses both terms several times in “The Cleansing of a Brewery,” a paper presented on March 13, 1916, at a meeting in London of the local chapter of the Institute of Brewing.

In a section on the maintenance of refrigerators, for example, Cole says “most brewers know that unless ‘friges’ and mains are kept thoroughly clean, trouble is bound to ensue.”

The earliest “fridge” cite in the OED is from Frame-Up, a 1935 crime novel by Collin Brooks: “Do you mean that you keep a dead body in a fridge waiting for the right moment to bring her out?”

The OED has examples of “frig” from as recently as 1960. Here’s one from The Quiet American, the 1955 novel by Graham Greene: “We haven’t a frig—we send out for ice.”

Although “fridge” is either the only spelling or the preferred one in the eight US or UK dictionaries we checked, a bit of googling finds that “frig” is not exactly cooling its heels today. Here are just a few of the many examples posted over the last year:

“Frig not cooling, freezer is fine” … “Looking for built-in frig with crushed ice / water dispenser” … “Frig not cold anymore. What can i do?” … “Freezer works but frig not cold” … “Freezer Semi Cold, Frig Warm.”

A similarly spelled verb, “frig,” which most dictionaries describe as vulgar slang, has more to do with heating than cooling. It means to have sexual intercourse or masturbate. (The present participle, “frigging,” is often used as an intensifier.)

How are all these frigging words pronounced? Well, the verb “frig” rhymes with “prig,” but the nouns spelled “frig” and “fridge” both rhyme with “bridge.” And “frigging” rhymes with “digging,” though it’s often spelled and pronounced friggin’.

The OED describes “fridge” as a colloquial abbreviation for “refrigerator,” a much older term that showed up in the early 1600s. It suggests that the ‘frig’ spelling may have been influenced by the brand name “Frigidaire” (a play on “frigid air”).

“Oxford, an etymological dictionary based on historical evidence, also notes that an 1886 edition of John Russell Bartlett’s Dictionary of Americanisms includes the short form “frigerator.”

We’d add that the company now known as Frigidaire was called the Guardian Frigerator Company when it was founded in Fort Wayne, Ind., in 1916.

The company adopted the name “Frigidaire” in 1919, three years after “frig” and “friges” were used in the brewery paper cited above. So the brand name “Frigidaire” may have influenced the usage, but it couldn’t have been the source.

We can’t tell from the published examples in the OED (or some earlier ones in Google Books) who originated the “frig” and “fridge” spellings. But we can speculate about why “fridge” has become the dominant spelling.

First of all, the natural pronunciation of “fridge” matches the way the second syllable sounds in “refrigerator.”

Although “frig” is pronounced the same way as “fridge” when it means a refrigerator, the natural pronunciation of “frig” would be like that of the naughty verb we mentioned above.

Our guess is that English speakers generally prefer the “fridge” spelling because they instinctively pronounce it the way the letters f-r-i-g sound in “refrigerator.”

We’ll end with a few lines from Ray Charles’s recording of Louis Jordan’s blues hit “I’m Gonna Move to the Outskirts of Town”:

“Let me tell you, honey
We gonna move away from here
I don’t need no iceman
I’m gonna get you a Frigidaire.”
Bama likes this.
Top
Post Reply